Advancing Care in the Hudson Valley
Presented by Westchester Medical Center
Browsing All Posts By

jonO

Westchester’s Largest Healthcare Construction Project in Decades Opens Doors to Patients

By April 18, 2019 Features

As seen in the May/June 2019 issue of Advancing Care 

This spring, Westchester Medical Center, the flagship of the Westchester Medical Center Health Network (WMCHealth), celebrates the opening of its state-of-the-art, 280,000-square- foot Ambulatory Care Pavilion, adjacent to Westchester Medical Center in Valhalla. Read More

You Might Also Like

Events Around the Hudson Valley – May, June

By April 18, 2019 Events

As seen in the May/June 2019 issue of Advancing Care 

Good Samaritan Hospital’s 34th Annual Spring Ball – May 3rd

Dance the night away while taking steps to improve local healthcare at this popular annual fundraiser for Good Samaritan Hospital, a member of the Westchester Medical Center Health Network (WMCHealth). Held at the Edgewood Country Club in River Vale, NJ, it’s an uplifting evening brimming with community pride. For information, call 845.368.5151 or visit BSCHSF.org/springball. Read More

You Might Also Like

A Revolutionary Way to Treat a Prostate Condition

By April 18, 2019 Features

Physicians at Good Samaritan Hospital use steam to kill benign prostate cells and improve urinary function.

By David Levine
As seen in the May/June 2019 issue of Advancing Care 

Read More

You Might Also Like

Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital Provides Specialized Care for This Childhood Threat

By April 18, 2019 Features

Specialized pediatric care for serious complications of the E. coli infection is becoming increasingly common.

By Debra Bresnan
As seen in the May/June 2019 issue of Advancing Care 

Read More

You Might Also Like

A Personal Trainer Shows Unstoppable Determination After Losing His Leg

By April 18, 2019 Features

Since losing his leg seven years ago, Billy Davis has completed a triathlon, built his client base and funded purchases of prosthetics for those in need.

By Melissa F. Pheterson
As seen in the May/June 2019 issue of Advancing Care 

Read More

You Might Also Like

A Bedford Horseback Rider Is Back in the Saddle Thanks to Advanced Care

By April 18, 2019 Features

As seen in the May/June 2019 issue of Advancing Care 

Read More

You Might Also Like

What Vaccines Does My Pre-teen Need?

By April 18, 2019 Just the Facts

Vaccinations for meningitis, tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis (Tdap) and human papillomavirus (HPV) are recommended for all adolescents beginning at age 11-12. “Some parents hesitate to give the HPV vaccine at 11-12 years since the disease is sexually transmitted, but the earlier you give the vaccine, the better the protection it provides,” says Sheila Nolan, MD, MSCE, Chief of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital, a member of the Westchester Medical Center Health Network (WMCHealth). Read More

You Might Also Like

What Should I Know About Prostate Health?

By April 18, 2019 Just the Facts

Initial symptoms of prostate cancer can be subtle, says J. Keith Festa, MD, Associate Director of Medical Affairs at MidHudson Regional Hospital, a member of the Westchester Medical Center Health Network, (WMCHealth). Read More

You Might Also Like

At What Age Do Men Need to Do Health Screenings?

By April 18, 2019 Just the Facts

Lisa Ferrara, MD, internal medicine physician at Bon Secours Medical Group, a member of the Westchester Medical Center Health Network (WMCHealth), says men should follow these guidelines: Read More

You Might Also Like

Why Is a Man’s Life Expectancy Less Than a Woman’s?

By April 18, 2019 Just the Facts

For one thing, the female heart is genetically designed to handle pregnancy, which offers protection during childbearing years. “Women’s hearts are able to handle a 30 percent increase in blood volume by the end of the second trimester, while men’s hearts cannot,” says William H. Frishman, MD, MACP, Director of Medicine at Westchester Medical Center, the flagship of the Westchester Medical Center Health Network (WMCHealth). “Although men have higher rates of sudden death than women, women die at about the same rate as men, just later in life,” says Dr. Frishman. Read More

You Might Also Like