Advancing Care in the Hudson Valley
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Nick Gallinelli

My Kids Want a Trampoline—Should I Get One?

By April 21, 2015 Just the Facts

My kids want a trampoline. Should I get one?

The short answer: no. “We strongly discourage the use of backyard trampolines,” says Darshan Patel, MD, Chief, Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center. This stance stems from the number of children’s injuries from trampoline use seen by the hospital’s Pediatric Emergency Department, which has included everything from minor contusions to major head trauma.

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Am I Depressed or Just Feeling Blue?

By April 21, 2015 Just the Facts

Am I depressed or just feeling blue?

May is Mental Health Month, but how can you tell if you’re experiencing a regular case of the blues—or something more serious?

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Brain Power: How MidHudson Regional Hospital Saved Hit-and-Run Victim Katarina Napolitani

By April 21, 2015 Features

On the night of a fierce lightning storm, Katarina Napolitani’s life changed in a flash.

It was July 8, 2012, and the 19-year-old from New Windsor, New York, was leaving a friend’s party in Newburgh when a moving car struck her in the street, throwing her more than 15 feet in the air.

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Is Lyme Disease the Only Tick-Borne Illness?

By April 20, 2015 Just the Facts

Is Lyme Disease the only tick-borne illness?

We all know that deer-tick bites can lead to Lyme Disease, and we know to be on the lookout for the bullseye-shaped red rash, joint pain and fatigue that goes with it. But Lyme Disease isn’t the only tick-borne illness common in this part of the country.

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Tiny Tools, Small Patients, Huge Medical Gains

By April 20, 2015 Features

In 2012, Donalee Mickler raced her 1-year-old daughter Zechia to the emergency room at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital at Westchester Medical Center. Zechia was in severe respiratory distress, and Mickler would soon learn her daughter was born with a diaphragmatic hernia—a hole in the muscle that separates the chest cavity from the abdominal cavity, allowing the abdominal organs to push into the chest area and often displace the lungs. “We learned that Zechia’s right lung was located in her back instead of her chest,” Mickler says. “She’d been working with one lung since birth and needed surgery.” It was a parent’s worst nightmare, but there was a silver lining—good news delivered by Zechia’s doctor, pediatric surgeon Samir Pandya, MD. “Dr. Pandya told us that her hernia could be fixed with a minimally invasive surgery.”

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New Ways of Monitoring the Brain Mean Better Outcomes for Those with Severe Brain Injuries

By April 20, 2015 Features

No one ever wants to get the news that someone they love has been diagnosed with a serious brain injury such as a stroke, a trauma or an aneurysm. But if you live anywhere in Westchester Medical Center’s region you should make room for a very precious commodity—hope.

Consider Moira*, an athletic, health-conscious, international business professional in her early 40s. Although Moira had been to her doctor for her severe, recurring headaches, no one suspected that her headaches were actually a sign of something more ominous: Moira’s aneurysm was about to rupture.

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Cordelia V. Sharma, MD, Takes a Leadership Role at Westchester Medical Center—and Beyond

By April 20, 2015 Features

Growing up in India, Cordelia V. Sharma, MD, always knew she would have a career in science. Her father, an engineer, had a keen interest in medicine, and her uncle and two sisters were physicians. “I was equally attracted to basic research and science,” she says. “It was a hard choice, but once I was accepted to medical school, I knew which direction I was going to take.”

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Non-Invasive Cardiologist Tanya Dutta, MD on the Roots of Heart Disease and How to Stay Heart-Healthy

By April 20, 2015 Features

Can you explain what happens to my heart during a heart attack?

Normally, your heart is fed oxygenated blood through blood vessels called coronary arteries. During a heart attack, a clot forms in the coronary artery, abruptly stopping blood flow. The heart muscle can become damaged from the loss of oxygen. However, if blood flow is restored quickly by a procedure called an angiogram, the heart muscle can be saved. Read More

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ShopRite Teams Up with Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital to Help Sick Kids

By April 20, 2015 Health News

ShopRite shoppers aren’t just picking up some groceries—they’re making invaluable donations to Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital.

Last year, the supermarket launched the “Together for our Children” fundraising campaign
for the hospital. Through two fundraising drives in the fall and spring, ShopRite raised more than $167,000 for the hospital, which went to support life-changing and lifesaving care for seriously ill and injured children. It then raised $138,000 more this year from February 22 to March 14.

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WMC is Making TAVR Easy

By April 20, 2015 Health News

Until recently, local patients in need of a transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) had to undergo general anesthesia. Because these patients often were of advanced age or had other health issues, general anesthesia wasn’t always tolerated by all patients, especially because it required a temporary breathing tube to be placed in the patient’s airway. Read More

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