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Just the Facts

What are the signs and symptoms of a stroke? 

By April 11, 2018 Just the Facts

“The most common signs and symptoms are weakness on one side of the body, trouble talking, loss of vision, slurred speech or the face becoming droopy,” says Mill Etienne, MD, neurologist at Good Samaritan Hospital, a member of the Westchester Medical Center Health Network (WMCHealth). “Less common signs include suddenly becoming clumsy, difficulty walking or even a severe dizziness. If you experience anything like this, call 911 immediately – and keep calm in the meantime, says Dr. Etienne. “Don’t eat or drink anything, because you might have difficulty swallowing, as well.” Read More

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What are the health-screening recommendations for women by age?

By April 11, 2018 Just the Facts

Age 21: Pap test for cervical cancer. Doctors recommend this screening every three years until age 30 and then every five years, along with Human papillomavirus (HPV) co-testing, ending at age 65 if you’re not at high risk for cervical cancer. Discuss concerns with your OB-GYN at your annual exam. “If there’s a change in sexual status, the patient should have an interim visit to her gynecologist and repeat testing as she enters into a new relationship,” says Christine Pellegrino, MD, medical oncologist at MidHudson Regional Hospital and Westchester Medical Center, members of the Westchester Medical Center Health Network (WMCHealth). Read More

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How do I recognize the signs and symptoms of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and what can I do about it?

By April 11, 2018 Just the Facts

 “PTSD can happen to anyone who has been exposed to a life-threatening event, like combat, physical violence, a car accident, a natural disaster or anyone exposed to sexual violence. Read More

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Am I a Binge Drinker?

By February 9, 2018 Just the Facts

According to Allen Nace, MA, LMHC, CASAC, Administrative Director of Community Rehabilitation Services/Addiction Treatment Services at HealthAlliance Hospital: Broadway Campus, a member of the Westchester Medical Center Health Network (WMCHealth), “Binge drinking is defined as five drinks for men and four drinks for women in a period of one or two hours. It is also thought to be heavy episodic drinking, with the intent of becoming intoxicated.”  Read More

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How Can I “Spring Clean” My Diet?

By February 9, 2018 Just the Facts

If you packed on a few extra pounds this winter, you’re not alone, says Susan Epstein, MS, RD, CDN, registered dietitian at The Surgical Weight Loss Institute at Good Samaritan Hospital, a member of the Westchester Medical Center Health Network (WMCHealth). Read More

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Here’s How to Properly React to Common Emergency Situations

By February 9, 2018 Just the Facts

From car accidents to cooking mishaps, when you’re faced with an accident, do you know what to do? Here, Westchester Medical Center Health Network (WMCHealth) emergency doctors at the region’s only verified Level I and Level II trauma centers offer their advice to manage some common scenarios.

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What is Your Health Advice for Heart Failure Patients?

By January 4, 2018 Just the Facts

Alan Gass, MD, FACC, Medical Director, Cardiac Transplantation and Mechanical Circulatory Support at Westchester Medical Center, the flagship of the Westchester Medical Center Health Network (WMCHealth), gives heart failure patients the same advice he gives to those who’ve had a heart attack: If you smoke, stop. If you drink alcohol, stop. If you’re overweight, lose weight. If you’re sedentary, exercise. Read More

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How can I keep fit through the winter?

By December 12, 2017 Just the Facts

It happens every year. As the cold and darkness sets in, fitness can fall by the wayside. But that’s no excuse to let your fitness goals slide. Read More

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Is snow shoveling bad for my heart?

By December 12, 2017 Just the Facts

When it comes to older adults and snow shoveling, know the risk factors, because according to Martin Cohen, MD, interventional cardiologist at Westchester Medical Center, the flagship of the Westchester Medical Center Health Network (WMCHealth), “Shoveling can be a very dangerous activity for many people, especially those with certain heart conditions, if the right precautions aren’t taken.” Read More

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How can we make sure sledding stays fun?

By December 12, 2017 Just the Facts

During a typical winter season, our pediatric emergency department cares for dozens of children injured while sledding, snow tubing and tobogganing,” says Darshan Patel, MD, Chief of Pediatric Emergency Medicine at Maria Fareri Children’s Hospital, a member of the Westchester Medical Center Health Network (WMCHealth). Read More

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